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Conservation Confluence April 2018

SPARLING RANCH: WILDLIFE ON WORKING LANDS

WHF helped conserve the Sparling Ranch with the establishment of a conservation bank, located in the rolling hills along the Santa Clara and San Benito County line. The 2,002-acre ranch serves as permanently-protected vital habitat for the California tiger salamander and California red-legged frog, and is located within a larger expanse of habitat for both species. In addition, Sparling Ranch contains beautiful oak woodlands and annual grasslands throughout the property.

Kelly Velasco, Associate Director


MONITORING VERNAL POOLS


As Spring brings warmer temperatures, water in vernal pools begins to recede and vibrant wildflowers appear. Goldfields, Fremont’s tidy-tips, downingia, and popcorn flower are just a few of the wildflowers commonly found in vernal pools. With only 10% of California’s vernal pools remaining, WHF is proud to hold thousands of acres of protected vernal pool habitat in the Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys. This photo of Rockwell Ranch in Placer County is a beautiful example of wildflowers surrounding a vernal pool.

Sarah Wood, Field Technician


OLÉ OLÉ FOR OLE!


WHF recently participated in the annual spring Outdoor Learning Environment (OLE) program offered to approximately 600 6th graders from Glenn Edwards and Twelve Bridges Middle Schools. Students spent the week at the OLE preserve in Lincoln, engaged and actively learning about the environment, plants, wildlife and cultural resources. WHF staff enthusiastically lead students through geology, wildflowers and oak woodlands stations. It was a great week!

Veronica Griffiths, Education Coordinator

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